Ale to the King.

Edinburgh's quality beer and ale review and culture site.

Archive for the tag “leith”

Live Pub Guide to Edinburgh: Plan of ATTK & Discounts

Now comes the time to reveal Ale to the King/CamRGB’s Plan of ATTK for tomorrow’s Live Pub Guide to Edinburgh!

As those of you coming along will already know we are meeting at the Teuchter’s Landing at 11 before continuing in the following order:

  • Teuchter’s Landing
  • Roseleaf Cafe Bar: 10% Discount on Drinks
  • Malt & Hops: Free mugs of chips

A wee bus ride to Stockbridge on the number 36

  • The Stockbridge Tap
  • Kay’s Bar
  • Dirty Dick’s Bar: 20% Discount on Drinks
  • Blue Blazer: 20% Discount on Drinks
  • The Brauhaus
  • Bow Bar
  • Brewdog Bar

In case anyone gets lost and for those joining us later into the tour you can locate our current whereabouts by phoning or texting me on:

07903914460.

The aim is to spend just over an hour in each pub; this is clearly going to run over, but that’s why we’ve decided upon such a conservative amount of time. This way no one feels like they should be sprinting a marathon and we should all get into all the pubs!

I, rather embarrassingly, will have a whistle with me. When we are approaching time to leave I will give a little blast on the whistle so people can sup up.

With that said, I’ll see you all at 11 AM tomorrow!

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Pub Review: The Leith Beer Co., the Shore, Edinburgh

Leith Beer Co. exteriorName: The Leith Beer Co.
Location: 58 The Shore, Edinburgh

Note: This is Ale to the King‘s review of The Leith Beer Co. on its opening night. As pubs do, The Leith Beer Co. may change and grow as it settles into itself.

Beer Selection: The leaflet that popped through the letter box promised “an eclectic draft and bottled drinks range”. True enough there was a good range of bottled beers available, both lagers and ales. You won’t immediately notice them, they’re tucked into the fridges behind the bar. I was actually left a little disappointed upon first arriving; before ordering you’re best to pop your head round the corner to the steps, where a massive blackboard displays all the beers they sell. There’s nothing Leith Beer Co. Beer Listhere that’s particularly new or unusal, but it does cover all the bases. And I do mean all.

That was a relief as I was a tad disappointed by the draft beers on offer. It was the standard range you’d find in any Edinburgh pub that didn’t specialise in ale. The pint of the week was the now ubiquitous Blue Moon from Coors. The only beer I’d not seen before was the Belhaven Black Stout, which was rather tasty, and that’s coming from someone who doesn’t particularly regard Belhaven Best.

Atmosphere: Having never visited in its previous incarnation, The Waterline, its impossible for me to compare its atmosphere now to what it once was. On opening night The Leith Beer Co. was bright and airy, if rather subdued and quiet. A thirties crowd seems to frequent this place (with three groups of people talking about Zombies at once oddly).  You’ll easily find somewhere quiet where you can keep yourself to yourself.

Staff: Very helpful and quick to serve. They seem to know a thing or two about beer and are happy to advise and chat. There’s an encouraging air of professionalism here with this welcomeness as well.

Interior/Exterior: This may be hard to judge, since on a morning drive-by people were clearly still putting the finishing touches to the innards. As a result the whole place smelt strongly of B&Q.  It was a very strange experience, to the point it almost interferred with my bottle of Orkney Brewery Dark Isle.

The decoration is very stock, with generic prints of general old-timey-brewy-stuff on the walls and hung on canvas. The chairs are comfortable and the main material used is wood. I don’t know whether its the newness that makes it seem somewhat cheap, only time will tell on that matter.

I can see what they’re going for, a clash of rustic and industrial; the old-timey prints are nicely teamed with ultra-functional looking metal hanging lights, suspended from their most appealing flourish, the solid wooden-planked roof. The Leith Beer Co. seems to be straining for individuality against a tight leash imposed by its owner Belhaven.

There’s a pleasant area out front packed with pub benches where you can watch the ducks and swans on the Water of Leith.

Unfortunately it doesn’t do enough to warrant a near return, especially because its sat so near to three of the ten best ale pubs in Edinburgh.

With a greater range of beers this would have potential to grow into a welcome addition to the Shore, but sadly it falls below what’s already on offer at other pubs.

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Join us for our first ever event in Edinburgh here.

Review: Maid in Leith – Aledvent Calendbeer 13

Beer: Maid in Leith
Brewery: Williams Brothers Brewing Co.
Type: Golden Ale
Served: Bottled
Alc: 4% Vol
Aledvent Calendbeer: 12

The festive season is about home, and Ale to the King has already covered one aspect of that with the Samuel Smith’s India Ale from Yorkshire. But this reviewer may very well soon be buying a home, hopefully in the Shore area of Leith. So if the festive season is about home, then Maid in Leith covers the possible ghost of Christmas future.

On the pour the colour is noticeably bright as sunshine. Its also incredibly transparent and looks like a thin tree sap with absolutely no head at all.

On the nose the summery theme continues (again, this isn’t exactly the most wintery drink); its got dandelions and fresh grass and there’s an unmistakably pollen like smell to it.

The flavour, however, is hard to get hold of. It just comes across as a very generic golden ale that’s not aiming for anything but to please as many people’s palates as possible. There’s a nice fizz on the tongue but the sugary sweetness that goes with it is a little too much for my taste. Its like a little bit too much butter has been added to a recipe and it overpowers the rest of the ingredients.

A little distinction is the slight hints of olive or perhaps olive oil on the mid-taste and especially pronounced by the viscous after-taste. Unfortunately its a little bit of a one trick pony and seems just bland and generic. It only just raises itself above mass produced stuff, but it seems to aspire to be one of those things in itself. A little more alcohol would give this the kick it sorely lacks and it seems a beer designed to fill a nicely designed, trendy label. Its a brew that wants to be sold more than it wants to be a good brew.

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